What Happens When You Euthanize a Dog?

When a dog’s quality of life declines to the point that euthanasia is considered, owners face many questions. What happens when you euthanize a dog? Will my pet suffer? What should I expect on that final veterinary visit? As a seasoned veterinarian, I have guided countless grieving owners through this process

In this article, I will walk you through the step-by-step process of euthanizing a dog. You will learn what to expect before, during, and after this challenging procedure. I aim to provide clear information so you can make the most loving decision for your pet

What Happens When You Euthanize a Dog?

When a beloved family dog reaches the end of life, one of the most challenging decisions owners face is whether to euthanize or natural death. As hard as it is to say goodbye to your dog, euthanasia is the most humane option when a dog suffers from an incurable condition or poor quality of life.A dog sleeping on a couch with a ray of sunlight on her head 

What Leads Owners to Consider Euthanasia?

As our dogs age, progressive debilitating disease may affect quality of life especially when treatment is no longer effective for them. Euthanasia may be considered as the most kind option to help our dogs transition in these circumstances:

  • Debilitating arthritis that no longer responds to pain medication. Symptoms include: severe lameness, whining, disrupted sleep patterns, behavior changes or new aggression, or reluctance to move. Your veterinarian may have prescribed additional pain medications or increased their dose without significant improvement.  
  • Late-stage cancer that has stopped responding to therapy or developed resistance to immune suppressive medications. Your pet may experience symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia or discomfort that palliative medications are no longer able to help control. For instance, a feline with mouth cancer needs euthanasia.
  • Kidney failure typically presents with symptoms such as increased thirst, urination, decreased appetite, anorexia, vomiting or diarrhea. As the disease progresses, medications recommended to help alleviate these symptoms may no longer help or patients deteriorate further. Patients may also no longer tolerate fluids under the skin that help reduce dehydration and keep toxins from building up in the body. Over time, kidney failure progresses regardless of palliative care. 
  • Liver disease typically presents with early non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea or decreased appetite. Liver disease is determined by a blood test detecting elevated liver values and possibly an abdomen ultrasound or x-ray. Causes of Liver disease may be: infection, chronic inflammation, cancer, obstructed gallbladder or even prolonged anorexia in cats causing fat to infiltrate into the liver (called hepatic lipidosis). Liver disease may be treated in some cases and even reversed. Other times, euthanasia may be recommended if the condition has progressed to liver failure. Euthanasia is often recommended if malignant liver cancer is present. *Hemangiosarcoma is the most aggressive type of liver cancer.   
  • Heart failure occurs when the heart is no longer effectively pumping blood to the organs. Symptoms may include: panting, coughing, restlessness, increased effort to breathe or abdominal breathing, muddy mucous membranes, abdomen dissension or ascites. If these signs are noted, emergency intervention or euthanasia is needed immediately to avoid suffering. 

In these situations, euthanasia would help alleviate suffering. As difficult as it is, owners often find comfort knowing they have ensured a more peaceful passing without further discomfort.

What is the Euthanasia Procedure?

If you decide to move forward with euthanasia for your dog, here is how long pet euthanasia take and an overview of the process:

  • Our veterinarian will meet your family and your pet. It is important everyone feels comfortable and a connection is established between the vet and the pet and also the vet and the family. We will first discuss the steps and help you feel comfortable with your decision as well as answer any questions you may have such as the pet euthanasia cost and after care.
  • When it’s time to put your dog to sleep, the veterinarian will administer a relaxation medication first to help the pet fall asleep.  
  • Next, a catheter is placed in the dog’s front leg and secured. Pentobarbital is injected through the catheter. This injection gently stops the heart as an anesthetic medication, allowing the dog to drift off peacefully. 
  • Our veterinarians will confirm the dog has passed by listening for heart sounds.
  • You can take as much time as needed with your pet afterward to say goodbye.
  • We can arrange private cremation or other memorial options if requested.

When supporting owners through this difficult decision, our goal at Paws into Grace is to demystify the process and provide compassionate guidance. Euthanasia can be the final act of love we give our pets. 

 

A staff of Paws Into Grace bringing the products to the pet owner

What Are the Aftercare and Memorial Options?

After euthanasia, pet owners are often faced with the question of what to do next. There are various aftercare options like memorials to honor your dog’s memory:

  • Cremation: Many pet owners choose cremation to keep their dog’s ashes as a tangible reminder of their presence. Options include communal cremation, where ashes are not returned (spread at sea), or individual cremation, where you receive the individual ashes back to you.
  • Burial: Some pet owners prefer to bury their dog in a particular place, such as a pet cemetery or backyard. Ensure that local regulations permit this option.
  • Memorializing Keepsakes: There are numerous ways to create keepsakes in memory of your dog, such as custom-made memorial jewelry with paw prints, engraved memorial plaques, or even commissioned artwork capturing their sweet personalities. 

How Does One Cope With Loss After Euthanasia?

Saying goodbye is devastating regardless of the circumstances. Be gentle with yourself as you mourn:

  • Allow yourself to grieve: It is important to acknowledge your emotions, permit yourself to mourn, and embrace grief. Giving oneself time to recover after the loss of a pet is crucial. There are ways you can grieve for the loss of your pet.
  • Seek support: Ask for assistance from friends, relatives, or a support group for pet loss. Speaking with people who have gone through a comparable loss may be consoling and make you feel less alone.
  • Create a memory book: Create a scrapbook or memory book in honor of your pet. Include memories of your dog in pictures, stories, and mementos.
  • Consider a memorial service: You may say farewell and remember your pet by holding a memorial ceremony or erecting a memorial in your house.

Though it will always hurt, most owners find solace in knowing their pet passed humanely and is at peace. With time, fond memories edge out the pain of loss.

A photo album of a pet as a remembrance

Related Questions

Do Dogs Know When They Are Being Euthanized?

No, dogs don’t know they are dying during euthanasia. While they may sense a change in their environment or the presence of their loved ones, our veterinarians at Paws into Grace strive to create a calm environment to minimize stress during the process.

Can a Dog Wake Up After Euthanasia?

No, a dog cannot wake up after euthanasia. Euthanasia involves administering a medication that ensures a peaceful and painless passing. The medications used are carefully selected to induce deep sleep and ultimately stop the dog’s heart, ensuring a humane and irreversible process.

Is it Cruel to Put a Dog to Sleep?

No, it is not considered cruel to put a dog to sleep when it is done for compassionate reasons. Euthanasia is a difficult decision made with the dog’s best interests in mind, aiming to alleviate suffering and provide a peaceful end to a life that may otherwise be filled with pain or poor quality of life.

Conclusion

Euthanizing a dog is a tough decision, yet it is sometimes essential to end their suffering and avoid additional anguish. The procedure is short and painless for them. Guided by compassion, we do the best for our dogs just as they have always done for us.

Testimonials

I can't recommend them enough. I had to say goodbye to my 21 year old cat companion. I read the reviews here on Yelp and chose Paws Into Grace and they made an unbearable situation not worse - from the people on the phone to the amazing doctor who... read more

Renee C.

My absolute love Dante had heart failure three months ago. After having him on many medications to help him, his enthusiasm and appetite declined last couple of days. He was in pain and we decided to help him go to heaven rather than torturing him... read more

Diane C.

I wanted to thank you for sending Dr. Brown to euthanize our beloved Myleigh on March 4, 2021. She was compassionate and accommodating, she explained every step of the procedure, and gave us some alone time with Myleigh after she sedated her, but... read more

Terry A.

Renee C.

I can't recommend them enough. I had to say goodbye to my 21 year old cat companion. I read the reviews here on Yelp and chose Paws Into Grace and they made an unbearable situation not worse - from the people on the phone to the amazing doctor who came out to the house. She was so understanding and supportive. They were all so helpful, understanding and nice. My girl got to stay at home and say goodbye in the backyard (a hummingbird flew over and it seemed like a good sign too). So glad I didn't have to take her to a cold vet office.

Diane C.

My absolute love Dante had heart failure three months ago. After having him on many medications to help him, his enthusiasm and appetite declined last couple of days. He was in pain and we decided to help him go to heaven rather than torturing him with more medications which would make him even more miserable. I called and spoke to a very kind lady who was patient as I cried through making an appointment. We made an appointment for 1:30pm. Dr. Toni arrived. She was very kind, explained everything to us and gave us the time to be with our boy after the first shot. He wasn't relaxing enough so she gave him a second shot. We stayed with him throughout the entire process and I carried him to her car in the end. It was a very difficult decision but knowing that our boy is not in pain, gives us some peace. We are thankful to Dr. Toni for her kindness and compassion. They will arrange the cremation for us. Since we are in a pandemic, we had our masks on and said goodbye to our boy in our garden.

Terry A.

I wanted to thank you for sending Dr. Brown to euthanize our beloved Myleigh on March 4, 2021. She was compassionate and accommodating, she explained every step of the procedure, and gave us some alone time with Myleigh after she sedated her, but before she attached the IV. We were relieved that we made the decision to let her go to doggy heaven at home. It was a tranquil and serene passing for her, and it very much aids us in the grieving and healing process knowing that she passed away so peacefully. Based on the grace and compassion Dr. Brown demonstrated on one of the most awful days of our lives we would not hesitate to recommend Paws Into Grace for others facing this very painful time.
San Diego Orange County Cremation Office