How Much Does It Cost to Euthanize a Cat?

We empathize with how heartbreaking it is to put your beloved cat to sleep. When it is time, you should be prepared both emotionally and financially for what is ahead. Unfortunately, finances may be a concern guiding some of these decisions. We would like to guide you through some of these anticipated costs and the euthanasia process. Knowledge helps remove the unexpected.  Being prepared for every aspect of this decision helps lessen the stress and anxiety that fuels and deepens grief. 

How Much Does It Cost to Euthanize a Cat?

It is overwhelming to understand why there is so much variation for the same process. Cat euthanasia performed in a veterinary hospital may be around $100 to $300. If euthanasia is performed at your home, prices usually vary between $290 to $450. A veterinary hospital may be more affordable because there is no travel to your home. Often mobile veterinarians making these house calls may have an hour or more of travel. These home appointments are typically longer, and the appointment is a very different transition process than those booked in a brick and mortar hospital. There are many reasons cost may vary. Geographic location in areas such as California are typically more expensive than more rural areas.  Mobile appointments with travel time are typically slightly more expensive than taking your pet to a traditional veterinary office. Other times, aftercare services, also referred to as cremation, may be included in the estimate, increasing the cost at a traditional hospital.

Person hugging a a white and orange colored cat

What Is The Process Of Euthanasia For Cats?

Euthanasia in cats typically involves a two-step process to ensure a smooth transition. Our veterinarians focus on removing stress and pain. A simple injection or premedication is given under the skin, which is a combination of a pain reliever and an anti-anxiety medication. The premedication step ensures that a patient relaxes and is completely comfortable before falling asleep. The following step is an IV or Intravenous injection, which given slowly helps a pet to go into an even deeper sleep before gently passing. Euthanasia with this process may be the best option when your cat is in persistent pain, not eating nor drinking, or has a disease that cannot be cured.

Putting your cat to sleep is a big decision for you as the owner. A  veterinarian’s recommendation for euthanasia is usually based on your cat’s quality of life, diagnosis, prognosis and physical exam findings.

After counseling from your vet, the final decision will be up to you. The vet will give you time to evaluate the situation. Remember that it will be very painful for us, as pet owners, but during the process your cat will no longer be in any discomfort. 

How Cat Euthanasia Is Performed

On the day of euthanasia, there may be an assessment if preferred and some forms to complete. Then, the Veterinarian will prepare for the first dose, premedication. Often times our veterinarians will use a familiar blanket to gently hold your cat during this process. After the first dose your cat will feel more relaxed and ready to be with you until they fall asleep.

The vet will allow you hold your cat before giving the last medication. After these moments with your pet, the vet will administer the second medication that will help transition your cat into a deeper sleep then slow down breathing and the heart until they pass.

It is important that an empathetic and skilled veterinarian handle the process, so they can provide the smoothest and most peaceful transition possible.

Are There Any Extra Costs?

Before euthanasia, further testing may be recommended. A physical exam may cost up to $100 depending on the location, type of veterinary hospital and the vet’s expertise. Typically, an emergency or specialty veterinary hospital is more expensive.

Moreover, some of the disposable medical supplies that your cat will need during the process may also be charged to you. After the process of euthanasia, your vet may ask you about your plans for the remains of your beloved pet. You can choose between cremation or home burial.

Cremation Or Burial?

Pet cremation may be individual or communal. Individual cremation may cost around $250 including a cedar, bamboo or bio-degradable urn and a clay paw print. Communal cremation is typically closer to $150. Though this type of cremation is cheaper, remains are scattered at sea rather than returned home. 

Another choice is pet burial. There are regulations and limitations for home burial, but pet cemeteries may be an alternative. Cemetery burial costs range between $800 to $1,000 typically. 

Cat Euthanasia Tips 

Here are some other tips to remember:

  • Generally, vets will not recommend euthanasia for well pets that do not have terminal illness.
  • You may pay in advance so that you are more emotionally present. There are so many raw emotions and you should allow yourself the grace to be with them. You will need time to grieve, remember, and honor your pet rather than fiddling around with a wallet. Consider making these arrangements ahead of time to relieve some burden and stress on yourself. 
  • Have an open mind and an honest assessment. Tell your veterinarian everything you observe because these are essential clues along with tests to reach a diagnosis and prognosis of what to expect. These help veterinarians determine if treatment, hospice care, or euthanasia may be recommended. 

Paws into Grace consists of pet euthanasia experts that focus solely on the end of life, equipping them with the knowledge and work ethics to handle any situation. 

We have a team of highly qualified veterinarians who are passionate about palliative and end-of-life care to help your pets undergo the most peaceful transition possible. 

Cat resting on a white fur blanket

How Can I Save Money On A Euthanasia For a Cat?

Losing your pet is already filled with so many emotions such as fear, guilt or grief. There are so many triggers that erupt to the surface leaving us vulnerable and thinking about the money may be even more overwhelming. Some tips to help with the financial burden are:

  • Elect to have euthanasia in the vet office rather than an in-home procedure.
  • If cremation is not affordable, you may go to a humane society to afford lower rates. 
  • Consider asking for a customized package to accommodate your requests.

Even if you are on a tight budget, you deserve to give your cat a peaceful and gentle transition. Paws into Grace offers customized packages. We will consider things like location, appointment time, and your pet’s weight and temperament before giving an estimate. 

Related Questions

Will a Vet Euthanize an Old Cat?

Yes, if your old cat is already sick with a terminal disease or poor quality of life and suffering.

Can a Cat Wake Up From Euthanasia?

No, once the heart stops beating from the high dosage of sedative a patient does not wake up. A Veterinarian calculates the amount of medication needed understanding the underlying disease present, pharmacology principles of the euthanasia medication and physiology. Veterinarians typically give more than the actual recommended dosage and use proper technique to ensure the heart stops beating in a predictable way. The vet auscults or listens for the heartbeat to stop and after this has occurred the patient is not able to wake up.

Conclusion

Cat euthanasia cost varies but if you prefer to have it at home the price will be higher. To help you decide what is best for your pet and your family, it is important that you know what to expect in end-of-life care. 

Testimonials

I can't recommend them enough. I had to say goodbye to my 21 year old cat companion. I read the reviews here on Yelp and chose Paws Into Grace and they made an unbearable situation not worse - from the people on the phone to the amazing doctor who... read more

Renee C.

My absolute love Dante had heart failure three months ago. After having him on many medications to help him, his enthusiasm and appetite declined last couple of days. He was in pain and we decided to help him go to heaven rather than torturing him... read more

Diane C.

I wanted to thank you for sending Dr. Brown to euthanize our beloved Myleigh on March 4, 2021. She was compassionate and accommodating, she explained every step of the procedure, and gave us some alone time with Myleigh after she sedated her, but... read more

Terry A.

Renee C.

I can't recommend them enough. I had to say goodbye to my 21 year old cat companion. I read the reviews here on Yelp and chose Paws Into Grace and they made an unbearable situation not worse - from the people on the phone to the amazing doctor who came out to the house. She was so understanding and supportive. They were all so helpful, understanding and nice. My girl got to stay at home and say goodbye in the backyard (a hummingbird flew over and it seemed like a good sign too). So glad I didn't have to take her to a cold vet office.

Diane C.

My absolute love Dante had heart failure three months ago. After having him on many medications to help him, his enthusiasm and appetite declined last couple of days. He was in pain and we decided to help him go to heaven rather than torturing him with more medications which would make him even more miserable. I called and spoke to a very kind lady who was patient as I cried through making an appointment. We made an appointment for 1:30pm. Dr. Toni arrived. She was very kind, explained everything to us and gave us the time to be with our boy after the first shot. He wasn't relaxing enough so she gave him a second shot. We stayed with him throughout the entire process and I carried him to her car in the end. It was a very difficult decision but knowing that our boy is not in pain, gives us some peace. We are thankful to Dr. Toni for her kindness and compassion. They will arrange the cremation for us. Since we are in a pandemic, we had our masks on and said goodbye to our boy in our garden.

Terry A.

I wanted to thank you for sending Dr. Brown to euthanize our beloved Myleigh on March 4, 2021. She was compassionate and accommodating, she explained every step of the procedure, and gave us some alone time with Myleigh after she sedated her, but before she attached the IV. We were relieved that we made the decision to let her go to doggy heaven at home. It was a tranquil and serene passing for her, and it very much aids us in the grieving and healing process knowing that she passed away so peacefully. Based on the grace and compassion Dr. Brown demonstrated on one of the most awful days of our lives we would not hesitate to recommend Paws Into Grace for others facing this very painful time.
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