Four Top Reasons to Spay Your Pet

By Elizabeth Benson

 

February 25, 2020 is celebrated as World Spay Day. This is a day to encourage pet owners to spay and neuter their pets, and there are many important reasons to do this.

 

 

Here are our top four reasons:

1. Pet overpopulation

There are roughly 2.7 million dogs and cats killed in shelters every year
because they never find a loving home. According to Mosby Foundation, only
one out of every 10 dogs find their forever home — don’t contribute to the
statistic! Spaying your dog or cat helps control the stray population, which means
less shelter pet deaths.

2. Reduced Cancer Risk

Spaying reduces cancer risk of mammary tumors in female dogs. Let’s start with a little background on mammary tumors, also known as breast cancer. As a hospice veterinarian, this is one of the most disheartening things for me to diagnose because it is often preventable. The simple prevention is spaying your dog and cat.

According to the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, dogs who are spayed before their first heat have a 0.5% chance of developing these tumors, while dogs spayed after their second heat have a 26% chance. In cats, spaying reduces the risk of mammary tumors by 40-60%! These tumors are malignant or cancerous in 50% of dogs and about 90% of cats, so spaying your pet is crucial for their health and cancer prevention.

3. Avoid Cesarean Section
Spaying your pet will prevent them from ever needing a C-section. C-sections are not uncommon in pets and are often needed if there is an accidental mating, resulting in puppies that are too large to pass through the pelvis. Other reasons include uterine inertia (the uterus is no longer able to contract) due to malposition of fetuses or hypocalcemia (low calcium). C-sections are very expensive and spaying your pet is less risky and puts much less stress on your wallet. Preventative care by spaying avoids having to put your dog or cat through emergency surgery and recovery.

4. Prevent Pyometra
Spaying your pet prevents Pyometra, also known as a pus-filled uterus. When a dog or cat is not spayed, the fluctuating hormone levels can change the uterus, making it more prone to developing an infection. These infections are life-threatening if not treated immediately with surgery, which again is much more costly than spaying your pet.

An easy way to avoid all of these complications is to spay or neuter your cat or dog within their first year. Dogs should be spayed between six and nine months of age, or before their first heat. Cats can be spayed around five to six months.

Testimonials

I can't recommend them enough. I had to say goodbye to my 21 year old cat companion. I read the reviews here on Yelp and chose Paws Into Grace and they made an unbearable situation not worse - from the people on the phone to the amazing doctor who... read more

Renee C.

My absolute love Dante had heart failure three months ago. After having him on many medications to help him, his enthusiasm and appetite declined last couple of days. He was in pain and we decided to help him go to heaven rather than torturing him... read more

Diane C.

I wanted to thank you for sending Dr. Brown to euthanize our beloved Myleigh on March 4, 2021. She was compassionate and accommodating, she explained every step of the procedure, and gave us some alone time with Myleigh after she sedated her, but... read more

Terry A.

Renee C.

I can't recommend them enough. I had to say goodbye to my 21 year old cat companion. I read the reviews here on Yelp and chose Paws Into Grace and they made an unbearable situation not worse - from the people on the phone to the amazing doctor who came out to the house. She was so understanding and supportive. They were all so helpful, understanding and nice. My girl got to stay at home and say goodbye in the backyard (a hummingbird flew over and it seemed like a good sign too). So glad I didn't have to take her to a cold vet office.

Diane C.

My absolute love Dante had heart failure three months ago. After having him on many medications to help him, his enthusiasm and appetite declined last couple of days. He was in pain and we decided to help him go to heaven rather than torturing him with more medications which would make him even more miserable. I called and spoke to a very kind lady who was patient as I cried through making an appointment. We made an appointment for 1:30pm. Dr. Toni arrived. She was very kind, explained everything to us and gave us the time to be with our boy after the first shot. He wasn't relaxing enough so she gave him a second shot. We stayed with him throughout the entire process and I carried him to her car in the end. It was a very difficult decision but knowing that our boy is not in pain, gives us some peace. We are thankful to Dr. Toni for her kindness and compassion. They will arrange the cremation for us. Since we are in a pandemic, we had our masks on and said goodbye to our boy in our garden.

Terry A.

I wanted to thank you for sending Dr. Brown to euthanize our beloved Myleigh on March 4, 2021. She was compassionate and accommodating, she explained every step of the procedure, and gave us some alone time with Myleigh after she sedated her, but before she attached the IV. We were relieved that we made the decision to let her go to doggy heaven at home. It was a tranquil and serene passing for her, and it very much aids us in the grieving and healing process knowing that she passed away so peacefully. Based on the grace and compassion Dr. Brown demonstrated on one of the most awful days of our lives we would not hesitate to recommend Paws Into Grace for others facing this very painful time.
Font Resize
Contrast
Text Us